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Andrew Longhi

Andrew Longhi is an associate in the firm’s Washington, DC office and a member of the Data Privacy and Cybersecurity and Technology and Communications Regulation Practice Groups.

Andrew advises clients on a broad range of privacy and cybersecurity issues, including compliance obligations, commercial transactions involving personal information and cybersecurity risk, and responses to regulatory inquiries.

Andrew is Admitted to the Bar under DC App. R. 46-A (Emergency Examination Waiver); Practice Supervised by DC Bar members.

On June 10, 2024, the U.S. Supreme Court denied a petition for a writ of certiorari in Consumers’ Research et al. v. Federal Communications Commission et al.  In its petition, the advocacy group Consumers’ Research, along with a small carrier and a five individuals, sought the Supreme Court’s review of the constitutionality of

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently adopted two Notices of Apparent Liability (NALs) in connection with its investigation into AI-based “deepfake” calls made to New Hampshire voters on January 21, 2024.  The NALs follow a cease-and-desist letter sent on February 6 to Lingo Telecom, LLC (Lingo), a voice service provider that originated the calls, demanding that it stop originating unlawful robocall traffic on its network, which we previously blogged about here.Continue Reading FCC Proposes Fines for AI-based “Deepfake” Robocalls Before New Hampshire Primary

On May 10, 2024, a divided Second Circuit panel held that a device that merely selects and dials numbers from a stored list does not constitute an “automatic telephone dialing systems” (ATDS) under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA).  The panel observed in Soliman v. Subway Franchisee Advertising Fund Trust Ltd. that its holding

Over the past few months, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) has received requests from U.S. Senators asking the FTC to investigate the data collection practices of several automotive manufacturers.  Last week, Senators Ed Markey (D-MA) and Ron Wyden (D-OR) sent a letter to the FTC asking the agency to investigate several automakers for “deceiving their customers by falsely claiming to require a warrant or court order before turning over customer location data to government agencies.”  Among other things, the letter alleges inconsistent data collection and retention practices in the industry, asserting that some automakers only collect location data for a “critical safety event” (e.g., collision, air bag deployment, or automatic emergency braking event) while others “routinely collect[] and retain[] vehicle location data.”  The letter also states that only one automaker has a policy of informing consumers about legal demands for their data.  The letter refers to the FTC’s recent geolocation “crack down” in other contexts and urges “the FTC to investigate these auto manufacturers’ deceptive claims as well as their harmful data retention practices” and to, “in addition to taking appropriate action against the companies, . . . consider holding these companies’ senior executives accountable for their actions.”Continue Reading Data Collection by Auto Manufacturers under Scrutiny

On May 2, 2024, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released a draft Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for consideration at the agency’s May 23 Open Meeting that proposes to “prohibit from recognition by the FCC and participation in [its] equipment authorization program, any [Telecommunications Certification Body (TCB)] or test lab in which an entity identified

A new post on the Covington Inside Privacy blog discusses remarks by California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) Executive Director Ashkan Soltani at the International Association of Privacy Professionals’ global privacy conference last week.  The remarks covered the CPPA’s priorities for rulemaking and administrative enforcement of the California Consumer Privacy Act, including with respect to connected

On April 4, 2024, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel released a draft of the agency’s long-anticipated Safeguarding and Securing the Open Internet Order (Open Internet Order), which would reclassify broadband Internet access service as a telecommunications service under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.  The FCC is expected to consider and vote on the draft at its next Open Commission Meeting scheduled for April 25, 2024.  The FCC is expected to adopt the Open Internet Order now that Democrats hold a 3-2 majority at the agency.Continue Reading FCC Shares Draft Open Internet Order Ahead of April Meeting

Last month, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) raised the fixed broadband speed benchmark from 25/3 megabits per second (“Mbps”) to 100/20 Mbps and concluded that “advanced telecommunications capability is not being deployed to all Americans in a reasonable and timely fashion.” As a consequence, the FCC concluded that “section 706 [of the Telecommunications Act of 1996] requires [it] to ‘take immediate action to accelerate deployment of such capability by removing barriers to infrastructure investment and by promoting competition in the telecommunications market.’”Continue Reading FCC Raises Speed Benchmark for Fixed Broadband Services

This quarterly update highlights key legislative, regulatory, and litigation developments in the first quarter of 2024 related to artificial intelligence (“AI”), connected and automated vehicles (“CAVs”), and data privacy and cybersecurity.  As noted below, some of these developments provide industry with the opportunity for participation and comment.Continue Reading U.S. Tech Legislative, Regulatory & Litigation Update – First Quarter 2024

On March 25, 2024, Maine Governor Janet Mills signed into law LD 2234, which amends the state’s telephone solicitation statute to prohibit telephone solicitors from “fail[ing] to use the reassigned numbers database to verify that a consumer’s telephone number has not been reassigned prior to initiating a telephone sales call to that consumer.”  The bill defines “reassigned numbers database” as the “database created and maintained by the Federal Communications Commission that identifies whether a telephone number has been reassigned.”Continue Reading Maine Enacts New Telemarketing Law Requiring Use of FCC Reassigned Numbers Database