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Christopher Walter

Christopher Walter works with employer clients on domestic and international HR-legal compliance, disputes, and transactional projects. Chris is a former co-chair of the firm’s International Employment practice, and previously served for eight years as Managing Partner of the London office.

Chris’s advisory practice encompasses the full range of employment and employee benefits issues that matter to leading multinational employers, including the drafting of share and other incentive plans, global mobility, privacy compliance, employment issues in M&A transactions, outsourcing, workforce integration, and the implementation of core policies/codes of conduct, with a particular focus on business and human rights.

Chris began his legal career as a UK barrister, however, and also has considerable experience as an advocate before UK courts and tribunals, securing confidentiality injunctions and defending employers against claims of unfairness, discrimination and other alleged violations of employment laws.

Chris is recommended by Legal 500 UK for his “exceptional service.” Chambers UK (2015) notes that he is "focused, business-oriented and solution-driven." Chris has been listed by Who's Who Legal since 2007 as one of the world's top employment lawyers.

Chris has served as chair of the International Committee of the Employment Lawyers Association and a member of ELA’s Management Committee. He is also a member of the European Employment Lawyers Association and the Share Plan Lawyers Group.

Chris regularly publishes articles and speaks on employment and data privacy law at both external seminars and in-house client training events.

In Penhallurick v MD5 Ltd [2021] EWHC 293 (IPEC) the Court held that the copyright in various literary works relating to software Mr. Penhallurick created during his tenure with former employer MD5 belonged to MD5. The Court found that the works were created in the course of Mr. Penhallurick’s employment with the result that MD5 was deemed the owner of the works (under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988), despite the fact that some of the work was done from Mr. Penhallurick’s home, outside normal office hours and using his own computer.
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