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Megan Crowley

Megan Crowley is a litigator who represents clients in high-stakes matters, from case inception through trial and appeal. Her practice focuses on complex commercial disputes and litigation under the Administrative Procedure Act. Megan currently represents several leading technology companies in cutting-edge litigation relating to cybersecurity and data privacy.

Megan rejoined Covington from the U.S. Department of Justice, where she defended executive branch agencies in some of their most high-profile cases. Drawing upon this experience, she has secured a number of landmark victories against the federal government in recent years. Megan was a key member of the Covington team that represented TikTok in its successful challenge to the Trump Administration’s efforts to ban the app, and its defense of the district court’s injunction on appeal. She also represented Xiaomi Corporation in its successful challenge to the Department of Defense designation that would have banned the company from U.S. financial markets, securing a preliminary injunction and, ultimately, a rescission of the ban.

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to issue opinions in the coming months in two highly-anticipated cases — Moody v. NetChoice, L.L.C. (11th Cir.) and NetChoice, L.L.C. v. Paxton (5th Cir.) — that could potentially have significant implications for how companies moderate content on their platforms.Continue Reading U.S. Supreme Court Expected to Rule on NetChoice Cases in the Coming Months

Today, the Supreme Court issued its opinion in Gonzalez v. Google LLC, a case about whether Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (47 U.S.C. § 230) protected YouTube’s recommendation algorithms from a claim of secondary liability under the Anti-Terrorism Act (ATA). In a short, three-page per curiam opinion, the Court avoided addressing the

On September 16, the Fifth Circuit issued its decision in NetChoice L.L.C. v. Paxton, upholding Texas HB 20, a law that limits the ability of large social media platforms to moderate content and imposes various disclosure and appeal requirements on them.  The Fifth Circuit vacated the district court’s preliminary injunction, which previously blocked the Texas Attorney General from enforcing the law.  NetChoice is likely to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the Fifth Circuit’s decision.

HB 20 prohibits “social media platforms” with “more than 50 million active users” from “censor[ing] a user, a user’s expression, or a user’s ability to receive the expression of another person” based on the “viewpoint” of the user or another person, or the user’s location.  HB 20 also includes various transparency requirements for covered entities, for example, requiring them to publish information about their algorithms for displaying content, to publish an “acceptable use policy” with information about their content restrictions, and to provide users an explanation for each decision to remove their content, as well as a right to appeal the decision.Continue Reading Fifth Circuit Upholds Texas Law Restricting Online “Censorship”